Herbal Profile: Calendula

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is a beautiful and vibrant plant. It is a friend to many gardeners under the name of “pot marigold,” and has been cultivated for centuries. The flowering tops are the part that is most commonly used in medicine and cosmetics, and this herb is very easy to grow and maintain in a  garden.

To dry the flowers string them on a thread using a needle and hang them in a dim place for several weeks until thoroughly dried. Store in an airtight container once dried in a dark place.

Calendula BlossomThe Properties of Calendula:  ( See the Herbal Terminology Post for Definitions)
Antispasmodic, Aperient, Cholagogue, Diaphoretic, Vulnery.

Uses for Calendula Include:

Medicinal: Helps with ulcers, stomach cramps, colitis, diarrhea, fever, boils, abscesses, wounds, bruises, sprains, pulled muscles, sores, warts, menstrual difficulties, and to prevent recurrent vomiting.

Cosmetic: Used to help the skin regain elasticity, and a more youthful appearance, soothe chapped skin, and soften the skin.

Energetic and Spiritual: Calendula is an herb belonging to the element of Fire and is in tune with the planetary energies of the Sun. It is used for protection when hung, scattered, or planted around the home; or strewn under beds to guard against nightmares.

When burned in an incense this plant helps to consecrate items, people, or an area. The flowers can also be added to a bath to give a person’s aura a glow of attractiveness and vitality.

Calendula FlowersApplications of Calendula:

Infusion: use 1 to 2 teaspoons fresh or dried flowers with 1/2 cup boiling water; steep for 5 to 10 minutes and strain. Take one teaspoon every hour. This method is useful for ulcers, stomach cramps, colitis, diarrhea, fever, menstrual difficulties, and to prevent recurrent vomiting.

Tincture: soak a handful of flowers in 1/2 quart of rectified alcohol or whiskey for 5 to 6 weeks shaking daily. A dose is 5 to 10 drops dissolved in a cup of warm water. This method is useful for ulcers, stomach cramps, colitis, diarrhea, fever, menstrual difficulties, and to prevent recurrent vomiting.

Ointment: simmer 1 ounce fresh or dried flowers in 1 cup of olive oil for 30 minutes. Do not let it boil. Strain, then add one ounce of beeswax. Allow this to melt; and when it is mixed into the oil mixture, pour it into an appropriate container to cool and set up. This method is useful for boils, abscesses, wounds, bruises, sprains, pulled muscles, sores, and warts; as well as cosmetic uses.

Contraindications: None known, but use with extreme caution during pregnancy.

Always check with a healthcare practitioner before beginning herbal treatments.

Information Pulled from:

The Herb Book by John Lust

The Master Book of Herbalism by Paul Beyerl

Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham

The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Magical Plants by Susan Gregg

Images from Google.com

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